Interlakes Official Comunity Plan

Note: The following is an excerpt of the Interlakes Official Comunity Plan (2004), converted to HTML. This excerpt is for reference purposes only and is not a legal document.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SCHEDULE ‘A’

INTRODUCTION

BROAD GOALS

  1. AGRICULTURAL
  2. RESOURCE AREAS/UNSURVEYED CROWN LAND
  3. COMMERCIAL
  4. INDUSTRIAL
  5. RESIDENTIAL
  6. PARKS, RECREATION, AND OPEN SPACES
  7. ADMINISTRATIVE, CULTURAL AND INSTITUTIONAL
  8. TRANSPORTATION
  9. TEMPORARY COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL PERMITS
  10. DEVELOPMENT PERMIT AREAS
  11. APPENDIX 1
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SCHEDULE ‘A’     

INTRODUCTION

An Official Community Plan is a document intended to be a statement of broad objectives and policies regarding the form and character of land uses within the geographical area affected by the Plan.

The objectives and policies contained within this Plan reflect interests of the community and agencies to whom the Plan was referred. Consultation was initiated with First Nations, the School District No. 27, the Thompson-Nicola Regional District, Advisory Planning Commissions for Electoral Areas “H” and “L”, the Agricultural Land Commission, BC Hydro, and government ministries, including Sustainable Resource Management, Water, Land and Air Protection, Interior Health Authority, Ministry of Forests, Ministry of Transportation, Ministry of Community, Aboriginal and Women’s Services, and Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. Public consultation commenced in June 2003, with a public participation session, and followed up with a questionnaire, and presentation of a draft plan. The community will continue to be informed on both amendments to the Plan and zoning amendments through the public hearing process of the Local Government Act.

Once adopted, the Plan will provide a reference for both the public and investors on anticipated land uses. In addition, the Plan will serve to inform senior government authorities on interests of the community, thereby encouraging the undertaking of actions that are consistent with the Plan. The Interlake Official Settlement Plan was in effect for about 20 years; the current Plan will be reviewed as required by legislation or changing community interests. Legislation does require that the Plan provide for housing needs for at least a 5-year period.

It is important to distinguish between an Official Community Plan and a Zoning Bylaw. The Official Community Plan is seen as land use direction over a macro-scale, where a Zoning Bylaw establishes land uses, setbacks, etc., respecting the policies and designations of the Official Community Plan on a micro-scale. For example, an Official Community Plan may establish a block of land as being designated Commercial. The corresponding Zoning Bylaw may further break down the uses into specific commercial uses, such as General Commercial, Tourist Commercial etc., with uses specific to the theme of the zone. Section 884 of the Local Government Act provides that where an Official Community Plan is adopted, any subsequent bylaw (including zoning bylaw) must be consistent with the Plan. Where a zoning bylaw is being considered by the Regional Board but not adopted prior to the adoption of the Official Community Plan, the Local Government Act provides that the zoning bylaw is deemed consistent with the Official Community Plan.

In addition to the Zoning Bylaw, the Official Plan can also be implemented by Development Permits, Temporary Commercial and Industrial Use permits, and Covenants (Section 219 of the Land Title Act).

 

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BROAD GOALS     

QUALITY OF LIFE

  1. To preserve the residential lifestyle and establish residential densities within the Plan area recognizing community values of preserving and enhancing the water quality in streams, rivers and lakes of applicable watersheds.
  2. To recognize the need for a variety of housing choices to meet the needs and affordability of area residents
  3. To recognize the service needs of changing demographics of the region by considering needs for human health and medical care.
  4. To encourage the approving officer to provide public access to waterbodies as enabled through legislation.
  5. To support efforts of the Health Authorities and non-governmental organizations in educating and informing the public on environmentally sustainable sewage disposal system designs and required maintenance.
  6. To minimize land use conflicts by planning for compatible adjacent uses which respect the use and scale of their surroundings.
  7. To encourage site planning and development to recognize the forest interface and risk of forest wildfire. The utilization of fire-resistant building materials and the consideration of fire fuel in proximity to structures is strongly encouraged by the Regional Board.

ECONOMIC

  1. To support the Agricultural Land Commission’s agricultural land preservation efforts by recognizing agricultural land within the Agricultural Land Reserve as a prominent use within the rural areas.
  2. To support and encourage small-scale agri-tourism initiatives that serve to benefit the agricultural economy.
  3. To recognize the predominant residential/recreation uses of the area, yet provide an employment base by considering commercial and industrial development that is of a use and scale compatible with the community.

ENVIRONMENT

  1. To recognize the importance of the shoreland riparian area for such purposes as to reduce shoreland erosion, filter contaminants from entering a waterbody, as wildlife corridors, and to provide shading and protection for fish stocks.
  2. To support the protection of environmentally sensitive areas as identified by the Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management and indicated for Crown Lands, and to consider these identified areas on neighbouring private land Plan amendment applications.
  3. To recognize the environmental benefits of clustered developments near shorelands, as density bonusing is permitted as per Section 904 of the Local Government Act.

CULTURE AND HERITAGE

  1. To encourage the protection and recognition of sites and structures with heritage values.

CONSULTATION

  1. To continue to encourage public participation and relevant agencies consultation to ensure that community goals and interests are reflected in Plan policy.
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1.0   AGRICULTURAL     

Background

The backbone of the Cariboo has traditionally been agricultural and forestry uses. Both sectors contribute to the economy of the Cariboo. The Agricultural Land Commission has established some Agricultural Land Reserves (ALR) in the area. The establishment of these reserves provides some stability to the agricultural economy. Numerous parcels also exist within the Plan area that have been established as agricultural uses that are outside the ALR. As well as providing some economic base, the agricultural properties serve as visual breaks from the residential subdivisions on the many lakes within the Cariboo.

1.1   Objectives

  1. Continue to support the Agricultural Land Commission in protecting agricultural land and agricultural opportunities in the Plan area.
  2. To prevent rural, residential and other non-farm development from adversely affecting agricultural activities.
  3. To protect agricultural land by maintaining larger parcels suitable for agricultural production.
  4. To support efforts by agriculture producers to diversify and enhance farm income by recognizing secondary land uses that compliment agricultural uses.
  5. To promote block exclusions of land from the Agricultural Land Reserve that, due to lot area and location, are not conducive to agricultural production. These properties are in clusters proximate to Sheridan and Roe Lakes; it will be an objective to process each cluster as a block exclusion application. A listing of identified properties is indicated in Appendix I.
  6. Work towards the formulation of a delegation of approval agreement with the Agricultural Land Commission for purposes of localized decision-making on applications to subdivide within the ALR, or for the establishment of a non-farm use.

1.2   Policies

  1. Schedule ‘B’ designates as AGRICULTURAL

    Land located within the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR), land located outside of the ALR butused for farming purposes, or land outside of the ALR but enclosed by the ALR, except:

    1. Those parcels located in a RESIDENTIAL designation; and
    2. Those parcels located in a COMMERCIAL or INDUSTRIAL designation.
  2. Land designated AGRICULTURAL shall have a minimum parcel size of 32 hectares.

    Notwithstanding the minimum parcel size required under the present bylaw, where the Agricultural Land Commission has approved the creation of a parcel under its Homesite Severance Policy, or approved a subdivision of land within the Agricultural Land Reserve as divided by a major road (greater than 20 m right-of-way width) no amendment to the plan will be required for the subdivision of the parcel, provided each parcel of land is a minimum of 4 ha. Where applicable, implementation of this policy is to be by zoning bylaw amendment.

  3. The Regional Board is undertaking initiatives to minimize the effect of human habitation of properties in proximity to a waterbody. To protect aquatic habitat and seek to improve water quality, the Board encourages efforts of agricultural stewardship groups to provide guidelines for agricultural uses near waterbodies. It is suggested that agricultural uses near waterbodies be subject to the following:
    1. A zoning bylaw proposes:
      1. Those parcels located in a RESIDENTIAL designation; and
      2. Those parcels located in a COMMERCIAL or INDUSTRIAL designation.
    2. The establishment of landscaping, tree planting or other features to provide shade and to provide drinking water for purposes of drawing livestock away from aquatic areas is strongly encouraged; and,
    3. Application of manure or pesticides near a stream or waterbody is discouraged.
  4. Notwithstanding the areas for future exclusion from the ALR as indicated in Appendix T, the Regional Board may support an application for exclusion from the ALR or an application for subdivision within the ALR, provided there are no negative impacts on agriculture, where it is demonstrated that the land is physically and economically incapable of supporting agriculture or it is recognized that the land’s agricultural potential is restrained by a combination of factors such as the proximity of residential development, the size, location and character of the parcel. A report by professional consultant, such as a Professional Agrologist, is recommended to justify the application.
  5. Guest ranches are recognized by the Regional Board and are an adjunct to farming ventures, and shall be regulated by the zoning bylaw.
  6. Zoning regulations shall establish setbacks, landscaped buffers and fencing on adjoining non-agricultural properties, with the purpose of assuring the continuation of the agricultural operation.
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2.0   RESOURCE AREA / UNSURVEYED CROWN LAND     

Background

Together with agriculture, resource uses such as forestry, compose the backbone of the economy of the Cariboo. Much of the plan area is Crown Land, including Unsurveyed Crown Land. For all intents and purposes the land use designation of Unsurveyed Crown Land on Schedule ‘B’ is to fully comply with objectives and policies for lands designated Resource Area. It is necessary to recognize the value inherent in the resource areas, both for open space, recreation, resource extraction, as well as for employment generation. Land and Water British Columbia, Inc. (LWBC) is the agency charged with development and marketing of Crown land. Areas of the Plan area are used for wildlife corridors, and may contain old growth forest.

Schedule ‘D’, entitled Environmental Values, indicates attributes such as mule deer winter ranges, old growth management areas, critical fish habitat, and water quality sensitivity ratings. Old Growth Management Areas are areas of crown land forest that are managed in order to provide ecosystem benefits attributed to old growth trees. Old-growth forests support assemblages of plants and animals, environmental conditions, and ecological processes that are not found in younger forests (younger than 150-250 years) or in small patches of large, old trees.

Mule deer ranges are areas of forested land that provide food and cover critical to winter survival of mule deer. Deer migrate to these areas from long distances in order to utilize these particular ecosystems during the winter months. Both mule deer and old growth management areas are considerations by government ministries in any Crown land development plans. We have provided this information only for resource identification, but have not written policy. Individual landowners may consider this information when planning subdivision layout.

The Regional Board has expressed high value on the lakes, rivers and critical fish habitat. To this end, Section 10.0 (Development Permit areas) of this Plan has established policy to protect perhaps one of the most significant features of the Plan area, that being lakes and waterways.

Visual resources are scenic, natural landscaping that can be used to buffer other uses, such as forestry practices. They can create to quality of life through the visual attraction by retention of natural landscape features.

2.1   Objectives

  1. To work with LWBC in seeking environmentally sustainable development, at a density similar to area developments.
  2. To support the retention of environmental values, as identified by the Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management and indicated for Crown Lands, and to consider these identified areas on neighbouring private land Plan amendment applications.
  3. To minimize conflicts between sand and gravel reserve areas and their processing operations, forest-related operations and adjacent land uses.
  4. To encourage the planning of building sites and to encourage the utilization of building materials that respect the forest wildland interface.

2.2   Policies

  1. Schedule ‘B’ designates as RESOURCE AREA and UNSURVEYED CROWN LAND

    Crown and private land located outside the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR), except:

    1. Those parcels located in a RESIDENTIAL or AGRICULTURAL designation; and
    2. Those parcels located in a COMMERCIAL or INDUSTRIAL designation.

    The designation of GRAVEL RESERVE can apply to land within or outside of the ALR.

  2. Land designated RESOURCE AREA or UNSURVEYED CROWN LAND shall have a minimum parcel size of 32 hectares.
  3. Support establishment of Visual Quality objectives from the Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management that seeks to provide vegetated buffers along roadways and other scenic locations.
  4. Where residential development is proposed, any re-designation of land shall comply with policy in Section 5.0, particularly Sections 5.26 and 5.27.
  5. Where land within the RESOURCE AREA or GRAVEL RESERVE designation abuts a RESIDENTIAL designated area and/or where the extraction of raw materials might alter the visual attributes of the lake and its surroundings, the Regional Board shall encourage resource extraction activities to be conducted in such a manner as to maintain the visual integrity of the area.
  6. Consider fire hazard risk when designing subdivisions, including, but not limited to:
    1. By providing for sufficient access/egress routes;
    2. Require the posting of any signage for street names; and,
    3. Suggesting that any building schemes incorporate fireproof building materials.
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3.0   COMMERCIAL     

Background

Commercial activities provide a source of employment as well as basic services to the community. Commercial resorts and campsite are important uses within the Plan area, and serve a vital tourism role.

3.1   Objectives

  1. To provide a level of commercial activity that is responsive to needs of area residents and tourism activity.
  2. To consider small-scale commercial activity that will provide or enhance employment opportunities for area residents in a matter that is compatible with the predominant residential use of the area.
  3. To ensure that the scale of commercial activities recognizes the rural setting and natural environment.
  4. To consider requests for home based businesses that do not negatively affect the predominant residential use of the area.
  5. To recognize limited bed and breakfast accommodations ,and limited temporary rooming and boarding accommodations within the Plan area, both to serve principally as temporary tourist and visitor accommodation.

3.2   Policies

  1. In order to maintain a generalized approach to this Plan, one “COMMERCIAL” designation will be illustrated on the Plan map (Schedule ‘B’). The zoning bylaw will be utilized to refine the particular uses, including but not necessarily limited to: ‘General Commercial’, ‘Tourist Commercial’, ‘Highway Commercial’, ‘Service Commercial’, and ‘Community Commercial’. An exception is the Interlakes Corners Development, as described below, that shall have a specific designation to reflect the commercial/industrial uses.
  2. Schedule, ‘B’ shall designate as ‘COMMERCIAL’, those properties that are zoned for Commercial uses and indicated as ‘Rural Service Centres’ in the Interlake Official Settlement Plan. As the boundaries of these service centers was not precise, applications to re-designate adjoining land to COMMERCIAL shall be considered. Notwithstanding the above, the Interlakes Corners Development shall have a distinct plan map designation, reflecting the commercial/industrial land uses.
  3. Direct highway type commercial development to major roads such as Highway 24, Horse Lake Road and Mahood Lake Road, but recognize the need for local commercial uses, such as, convenience stores, to serve settlement areas including but not limited to Deka/Sulphurous Lakes, Bridge Lake, Sheridan Lake and Lac Des Roches.
  4. Tourist Commercial activities shall be considered on a site-specific basis throughout the Plan area.
  5. Consider low impact commercial uses that are complimentary to the rural and residential nature of the area, but can enhance or generate area employment.
  6. To support home based businesses, such as home occupations and/or home industries that contribute to the rural economy, but not adversely effect adjoining property uses, and have limited scale of operations to not unfairly compete with commercial and industrial property uses. To this end, criteria for the scale of use and types of permitted uses are outlined in the zoning bylaw.
  7. When considering future designations and rezoning to permit commercial uses, the Regional Board should consider, but not be restricted to, the following criteria:
    1. The commercial use shall provide for efficient traffic movement, vehicular access and egress, and sufficient off-street parking;
    2. The proposed use shall be compatible and in character with surrounding land uses; and,
    3. The site will have demonstrated on-site sewage disposal capabilities, considering the density and type of use envisioned, and designed to meet or exceed provincial legislation. The provision of potable water will be required to meet or exceed provincial legislation standards.
  8. Development permits shall be utilized as a means of assuring appropriate landscaping, screening, signage and building facade.
  9. Large scale commercial uses, such as shopping centers, shall be directed to larger centers, such as the District of 100 Mile House.
  10. Temporary Commercial Permits pursuant to Section 921 of the Local Government Act may be considered for a commercial use of a short-term duration, on a parcel designated Rural Residential 1, Rural Residential 2, Agricultural, Resource Area, Commercial or Industrial. See Section 9.0 of this plan.

3.3   Specific Commercial Policies

  1. Local Commercial

    Local commercial activities exist in the Plan area, and are often concentrated in small clusters. An example is a fuel station with a convenience store, and perhaps a post office or restaurant either within one building, or spanning several structures. Due to the historic establishment of small settlements based on the larger lakes of the area, we expect that the need for local commercial uses will continue, perhaps upgrading or replacing existing commercial structures. As the larger trading area of 100 Mile House is some distance, we recognize,the need for local commercial uses.

  2. Tourist Commercial

    Campgrounds, recreational vehicle parks, and resorts are an important commercial use within the area. Siting of future such uses shall consider, but not be limited to the following:

    1. The facility should recognize and respect the adjoining land use. The use of mitigative measures such as natural berms and vegetation should separate the commercial use from the abutting land use; and,
    2. Impact on the shoreline should be minimal to respect the aquatic habitat, as well as to provide for erosion control. The usage of porous materials for boat launching facilities is encouraged so as to minimize the discharge of surface contaminants into the waterbody.
  3. The Interlakes Corners Development

    The Interlakes Corners Development is located at the intersection of Highway 24 and Horse Lake Road. It has been established as a mixed-use commercial/industrial serviced strata development, consisting of such present uses a building supply store; small strip mall with restaurant and convenience store; car/truck wash; real estate office, and a proposed neighbourhood pub. There are many lots available for development, with uses as permitted by zoning regulation. Expansion of the development is encouraged to full build-out, as its location serves the entire Interlakes Plan area. In order to enhance the visual quality of the development, the area is defined as a Development Permit area. Due to the varied commercial/industrial uses, the development will be referred to as the Interlakes Corners on Schedule ‘E’. A previous zoning application has established uses for the development. Any expansion beyond the presently designated area will require compliance with the applicable industrial or commercial policies of this Plan.

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4.0   INDUSTRIAL     

Background

Industrial uses play a minor role in land use on the Interlakes Plan area. At present, only two areas have Industrial zoning, being the Fawn Lake Lumber site on Highway 24, as well as some of the properties at the commercial/industrial Interlakes Corners Development. The Interlake Official Settlement Plan recognized the rural and recreational nature of the plan area and believed the area was unsuited to large-scale industrial development. As a result, processing and manufacturing activities are limited within the area. The Fawn Lake Lumber site has both a restrictive zone as well as a restrictive zone prohibiting subdivision as well as limiting land uses.

The Interlakes Corners site is zoned to permit a multitude of commercial and different scales of industrial use, ranging from Light Industrial to limited Heavy Industrial, however, the current maximum site area of some 1.2 hectares (3 acres) will limit the scale of industrial development.

Responses from a questionnaire prepared to obtain opinion on future development of the Plan area indicated that employment generation was desirable in the area. Undesirable land uses identified included sawmills, pulpmills, animal processing operations, and scrap yards.

4.1   Objectives

  1. To consider small-scale industrial activity that will provide or enhance employment opportunities for area residents in a matter that is compatible with the predominant residential use of the area.
  2. To ensure that the scale of industrial activities recognizes the rural setting and natural environment

4.2   Policies

  1. In order to maintain the generalized approach to this Plan, Schedule ‘B’ will only indicate one designation of “INDUSTRIAL” shall apply to the Plan map. The zoning bylaw shall be utilized to determine the type of industrial use, being either Light Industrial, General Industrial, or Heavy Industrial. An exception is the Interlake Corners Development, as previously described, that shall have a specific designation to reflect the commercial/industrial uses.
  2. Any proposed industrial use will be encouraged to locate on major corridors, such as Highway 24, Horse Lake Road and Mahood Lake Road.
  3. When considering future designations and rezoning to permit industrial uses, the Regional Board should consider, but not be restricted, to the following criteria:
    1. The use should have low air emissions, as well as low or recyclable solid waste disposal;
    2. Social and economic benefits are to be assessed as well as environmental impacts from a proposed general or heavy industrial development;
    3. The industrial use shall provide for efficient traffic movement, vehicular access and egress, and sufficient off-street parking;
    4. The proposed use shall be compatible and in character with surrounding land uses; a screening, landscaping and noise abatement plan to be assessed as part of the re-designation application; and,
    5. The site will have demonstrated on-site sewage disposal capabilities, considering the density and type of use envisioned, and designed to meet or exceed provincial legislation. The provision of potable water will be required to meet or exceed provincial legislation standards.
  4. Development permits shall be utilized as a means of assuring appropriate landscaping, screening, signage and building facade.
  5. The rezoning of land for animal processing, pulpmills, and scrap yards shall not be considered as compatible with a rural residential environment.
  6. Temporary Commercial Permits pursuant to Section 921 of the Local Government Act may be considered for a industrial use of a short-term duration, on a parcel designated Rural Residential 1, Rural Residential 2, Agricultural, Resource Area, Commercial or Industrial. See Section 9.0 of this plan.

4.3   The Interlakes Corners Development

The Interlakes Corners development is located at the intersection of Highway 24 and Horse Lake Road. It has been established as a mixed-use commercial/industrial serviced strata development, consisting of such present uses a building supply store; small strip mall with restaurant and convenience store; car/truck wash; real estate office, and a proposed neighbourhood pub. There are many lots available for development, with uses as permitted by zoning regulation. Expansion of the development is encouraged to full build-out, as its location serves the entire Interlake plan area. In order to enhance the visual quality of the development, the area is defined as a Development Permit area. Due to the varied commercial/industrial uses, the development will be referred to as the ‘Interlakes Corners’ on Schedule ‘E’. A previous zoning application has established uses for the development. Any expansion beyond the presently designated area will require compliance with the applicable industrial or commercial policies of this Plan.

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5.0   RESIDENTIAL     

Background

A prevalent land use within the Interlakes Plan area is residential use, mostly located in clusters around the many lakes of the area. These properties are used both by seasonal occupants, as well as by permanent residents. The Interlake Official Settlement Plan had made provisions for ample land to accommodate both the development that existed at the time of Plan adoption, as well as for future development. The background report prepared in 2003 indicated from BC Assessment data, that many residential lots were still undeveloped, yet designated and zoned for residential use. It is recognized that some of these lots are not strongly desirable due to factors such as lot configuration, soil characteristics and topography. Nevertheless, the Interlakes Area Official Community Plan has not increased the amount of land designated Residential from the Settlement Plan, but will provide for consideration of additional Residential designations by a sustainable and managed approach.

The Settlement Plan did make provisions for a minimum lot area of 0.8 ha and a specified minimum frontage of 45.5 m in the Lakefront Residential designation. Previous and current zoning bylaws have provided for a minimum of 0.4 ha lots with a specified water frontage requirement of 45.5 m. A public consultation in the form of a questionnaire indicated that most respondents favoured the retention of the current criterion. It will therefore be required to create a new zoning classification for 0.8 ha lakefront lots.

Deka Lake has historically been designated Lakefront Residential as well as Seasonal Residential. As the major subdivisions were created prior to any comprehensive referrals to the Ministry of Health, many lots have poor soil characteristics for on-site sewage disposal. Due to the small lot areas, the Settlement Plan had provided for minimum site areas of 0.4 ha and 45.5 m of minimum frontage. In addition, some areas were designated for Seasonal Residential, as the poor soil characteristics for on-site sewage disposal did not warrant permanent occupancy. Some 60 percent of the Seasonal Residential designated properties are vacant. During the term of the plan, the Regional Board will consider solutions to address environmentally sustainable development of the previously established Deka Lake residential lots.

5.1   Objectives

  1. maintain the rural character of the area, by permitting a range of lot areas.
  2. To encourage a range of housing types to prove affordable housing and housing to address special needs.
  3. To consider new residential development with regard to preservation of the natural environment.
  4. To consider Regional Board involvement in a process to establish the allowance for septic disposal systems on lots within the Deka Lake area that does not have percolation rates satisfactory to the Health Authority.
  5. To consider clusters of housing on the lakeshores or infill housing where environmentally sustainable, so as to provide expanses of undisturbed shoreline.
  6. To create lot site areas that permit the effective functioning of on-site septic systems and encourage site planning to provide for a replacement septic field.
  7. To minimize conflicts with resource uses, such as forestry and agriculture by establishing appropriate buffer zones within the residentially designated properties.
  8. To encourage the planning of building sites and to encourage the utilization of building materials that respect the forest wildland interface.

5.2   Policies

This section of the Plan reflects the predominant intense land use as being residential. The public consultation process indicated largely that sufficient land was available for development. The respondents were concerned about quality of life and believed the low-density development should be retained. Some interest was noted in developing interior lots, in the interests of leaving some lakes areas in a natural state.

RESIDENTIAL DESIGNATIONS

  1. For all applications that create waterfrontage lots, a site design ratio to not exceed 1 unit of waterfrontage to 3 units of property depth is encouraged, however, in no case, shall the minimum waterfrontage be less than 45.5 m.

    In cases where Schedule B designates as:

    • LAKEFRONT RESIDENTIAL (RL)

      Shall apply to all lands within 250 m of the natural boundary of area lakes, excepting the identified area on Deka Lake, lands otherwise designated in the Interlake Official Settlement Plan, and lands within 250 m of the natural boundary of area lakes that exceed lot site areas of 0.8 ha. The minimum lot area shall be 0.8 ha.

      In cases where a non-conforming lot is designated as Lakefront Residential on Schedule B, and contains two (2) or more residential units that may or may not contain an approved sewage disposal system, the Regional Board may consider an application to rezone the existing lot to allow the creation of new lots so that each non-conforming residential parcel is located on an individual lot provided that:

      • Each existing non-conforming residential unit contains an approved sewage disposal system;
      • Where any of the proposed lots do not contain an approved sewage disposal system;
      • The applicant ensures compliance with the “Shoreland Management Policy”; and
      • No lot is created that cannot meet the requirements of Ministry of Health sewage disposal systems.
    • DEKA LAKE SETTLEMENT AREA

      All lands currently designated as Seasonal Residential in the former Interlake Official Settlement Plan are designated as Deka Lake Settlement Area. The minimum lot area shall be the greater of 0.4 ha, or sufficient land to install on-site sewage disposal systems that meet or exceed Health Authority requirements. A minimum width of 45.5 m shall be provided for all lands within 250 m of the natural boundary of Deka Lake.

    • RURAL RESIDENTIAL 1

      Parcels that shall have a minimum site area of 4 ha

    • RURAL RESIDENTIAL 2

      Parcels that shall have a minimum site area of 2 ha

    • RURAL RESIDENTIAL 3

      Parcels that shall have a minimum site area of 0.8 ha, with the zoning bylaw specifying a minimum of 45.5 m of waterfrontage, where the land abuts a river. A “river” is defined as “a large natural stream of water emptying into a large body of water, as an ocean or lake, and usually fed along its course by converging tributaries”.

      Notwithstanding the above, existing lots of less site area than the minimum lot area permitted by designation, may be used for uses permitted by current zoning.

  2. Opportunities for affordable housing and special needs housing, is to be provided by zoning regulation, which is to include mobile homes, temporary additional dwellings, duplexes, and opportunities for two dwellings on larger holdings. In addition, mobile home parks can be considered, and an appropriate amendment to this Plan will be required to establish a designation in Schedule ‘B’; specific mobile home development policies are as follows:
    1. the mobile home site shall be located in proximity to a major road or major collector road, so as to minimize traffic through existing residential subdivisions;
    2. the mobile home park site will have a minimum site area of 2 ha, a maximum site area of 5 ha and a maximum of twenty bays;
    3. the site must have a demonstrated soil capacity to support on-site sewage disposal and sufficient groundwater for year-round use, unless a community water or sewage disposal system is provided;
    4. the mobile home park site should be buffered by the effective use of landscaping, trees, or fences so as to reduce conflicts between residential and other land uses;
    5. if the mobile home park is designed for family occupancy, proximity to schools, and a commercial core is desired; and,
    6. lands designated as Mobile Home Park, will have the companion map designation in Schedule ‘B’, and be required to be rezoned to a Mobile Home Park zone.
  3. In order to reduce the environmental impact on waterbodies, cluster housing will be permitted at a greater density than otherwise permitted by zoning regulation, based on density bonusing provisions of the Local Government Act, Section 904, where the developer provides amenities that are beneficial to the surrounding neighbourhood or community at large.  Such amenities can include the provisions for protection of environmentally sensitive areas or provision of a greenbelt.
  4. When planning site development in unserviced areas, strongly encourage the reserving of sufficient property to provide for an alternate sewage disposal system.  In addition, potable water supplies should be derived from sources approved by the Health Authority.
  5. The Regional Board may consider creating a higher density development designation for non-waterfrontage properties where community sewer and/or community water is made available. For waterfront properties, an increase in density may also be permitted, by way of a zoning bylaw amendment, where community water and sewer servicing is provided, however, in no case will the zoning bylaw allow the minimum waterfrontage to be less than 45.5 m, so as to prevent crowding along the shoreline
  6. Applications to re-designate land for additional residential development shall not be considered by the Regional Board, unless the applicant demonstrates through a review of existing residential land available, that the residential stock is insufficient to meet the five-year demand and that the land would be proven capable of supporting residential development, pursuant to Section 5.2.7, below. Where a proposed designation for a maximum of two lots is envisioned, the Regional Board may consider a less stringent supply-demand study.
  7. Any applications to re-designate land to a Residential designation, or to increase the density of an existing Residential designation shall require the proponent to prove that the topography is conducive to residential development, that the soils can support on-site sewage disposal, and that there is sufficient availability of groundwater for year-round use.
  8. To protect the integrity of agricultural uses, residential subdivisions shall be directed outside of the Agricultural Land Reserve. The Regional Board may consider large acreage developments where hobby farms are encouraged. In any case, it is the intent of the Regional Board to buffer residential areas from agricultural areas by requiring a minimum lot area of 4 ha for the residential properties.
  9. To protect aquatic habitat and seek to improve water quality, the Regional Board encourages efforts of agricultural stewardship groups to provide guidelines for agricultural uses near waterbodies. It is suggested that agricultural uses near waterbodies be subject to the following:

    A zoning bylaw proposes:

    1. to define setbacks of agricultural buildings and storage areas from the natural boundary of a watercourse or lake;
    2. to define a setback from areas designed to confine livestock, or to be utilized for manure storage structures to the natural boundary of a watercourse or lake;
    3. to define a setback from storage sites for fuel/oil, pesticides, and other chemicals to the natural boundary of any watercourse or lake;
    4. The establishment of landscaping, tree planting or other features to provide shade and to provide drinking water for purposes of drawing livestock away from aquatic areas is strongly encouraged; and,
    5. Application of manure or pesticides near a stream or waterbody is discouraged.
  10. Consider fire hazard risk when designing subdivisions, including, but not limited to:
    1. by providing for sufficient access/egress routes;
    2. require the posting of any signage for street names; and,
    3. suggesting that any building schemes incorporate fireproof building materials.
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6.0   PARKS, RECREATION, AND OPEN SPACES     

Background

As stated numerous times in the Plan, seasonal recreational activities account for much of the land use in the region. Much of the use consists of seasonal residential occupancy, however, fishing, hunting and other land or water-based activities account for pleasant recreational pursuits.

6.1   Objectives

  1. To provide ample opportunities for local residents and visitors to benefit from the recreational opportunities within the Plan area.
  2. To encourage the provision of adequate access to the lakeshore, for non-lakeshore landowners, as well as to interior Crown land, where passive recreation is appropriate.

6.2   Policies

Schedule B designates as:

PUBLIC RECREATION RESERVE (PRR)

  1. Land that has been set aside for recreational purposes by a provincial ministry or agency;
  2. Crown land established as a Recreational Reserve, or Crown Land designated as an area for Use and Recreation.
  1. Encourage senior levels of government to maintain Provincial Parks and Forest Recreational sites within the Plan area.
  2. Encourage the provision of lake access points for owners of interior lands. To this end, the Regional Board will seek lake access through rezoning processes, or by encouraging the subdivision approving officer to require lake access as provided for under the Land Title Act. These access points should be located at desirable points for public access, such as a low slope that would be at a suitable grade specified for road rights-of-way.
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7.0   ADMINISTRATIVE, CULTURAL AND INSTITUTIONAL     

Background

The establishment of firehalls, libraries, community halls, schools, public health facilities, community care facilities, telephone company buildings, post offices and the like, serve as support services for the Plan area. In addition, historic structures may exist from previous settlements or trade routes, and are valuable cultural assets. The Plan will not provide a specific designation for these uses on Schedule ‘B’, and will rather use zoning regulations to establish appropriate zones for such uses.

7.1   Objectives

  1. The Regional Board recognizes that urban centers are most appropriate for large-scale public health facilities, however, recognizes that a community health center would be appropriate for the area.
  2. The Regional Board recognizes the heritage and cultural values, as significant in forming an insight into area history.
  3. To recognize community needs for community and fire halls, as identified by the area residents.

7.2   Policies

  1. The Regional Board will give consideration to provide for zoning that will lead to the establishment of a health service facility to serve area residents.
  2. Consider requests for provision of public services, such as fire halls and community halls, should sufficient public interest be generated, and the community’s preparedness to provide operational support to these services.
  3. The Regional Board recognizes the importance of heritage and culture within the plan area. To this end, efforts to obtain funding from agencies to protect and enhance buildings and sites of historical significance will be encouraged and supported by the Regional Board.
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8.0   TRANSPORTATION     

Background

When the original Interlake Official Settlement Plan was written, Highway 24 was not yet a paved road. Highway 24 now serves as a picturesque, alternate route to the Yellowhead Highway, as well as a route to the communities within the Interlakes area. Other major roads within the plan area are Mahood Lake Road and Horse Lake Road.

8.1   Objectives

  1. To provide an efficient highway and major road system that moves goods and people in a safe, efficient manner.
  2. Provide for adequate supplies of road building materials within the region to provide for road maintenance.
  3. To maintain a dialogue with the Ministry of Transportation to ensure that the road system fulfils the needs of residents.

8.2   Policies

  1. Linear residential development along primary highways and major collector roads shall be discouraged, unless access to the lots is provided by a frontage road. Residential development shall be encouraged to locate along minor collector roads and local roads, or in the form of cluster development where direct access from residential lots would not cause the interruption of a steady flow of traffic or reduce road safety on the major roads. Only primary highways and major collector roads are regarded as major roads. Development control will be dictated by establishment of minimum lot areas as well as a review of subdivision applications.
  2. To work with the Ministry of Transportation when planning new roads or improving existing roads, to encourage the establishment of road rights-of-way for purposes of permitting pedestrian and cycle traffic to co-exist with vehicular traffic.
  3. Gravel Reserves should be maintained within the plan area to supply materials for road construction and maintenance.
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9.0   TEMPORARY COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL PERMITS     

Background

The Local Government Act makes provisions for Temporary Commercial and Industrial permits. The intent of these permits is to provide for the ability to locate a commercial or industrial use on a temporary basis. Rational for such a permit can be a short-term contract requiring only an activity for a limited duration. Legislation can permit a conditional permit for up to 2 years, with the ability to apply for one extension for up to another two-year period. Further extensions are not permitted. Upon expiry of the permit, the use must be removed, unless a zoning and plan amendment has been adopted.

9.1   Objectives

To consider the issuance of temporary commercial and industrial permits in specified areas of the Plan area.

  1. To consider the issuance of temporary commercial or industrial permits within properties designated as Rural Residential 1, Rural Residential 2, Commercial, Industrial, Agricultural, and Resource Areas on Schedule ‘B’.
  2. To stipulate conditions on the permit which minimizes the intrusion of the use on adjoining Agricultural and Resource Area designed properties, as applicable, including the possible requirement of sound and visual mitigation measures where the development is within 600 metres of a Rural Residential 3 or Residential designated property.
  3. The Regional Board may require the proponent to invite the local community to a public meeting prior to consideration of a resolution to conditionally approve the temporary use.
  4. Should the applicant wish the continuation of the use beyond the expiry of a permit, or expiry of a renewal, an application to amend the zoning bylaw and/or official community plan must be submitted well in advance of permit expiry in order to assure non-interruption of land use. It is recommended that applications be submitted six (6) months prior to permit expiry.
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10.0   DEVELOPMENT PERMIT AREAS     

Development Permit Area No. 1 – Form and character of Commercial and Industrial land development

All lands designated Commercial, Industrial, located within 200 m of the rights-of-way of Highway No. 24, Mahood Lake Road, and Horse Lake Road, and so identified on Schedule ‘E’ are designated as a Development Permit Area in accordance with Section 919.1(f) of the Local Government Act.

Category

To establish objectives and guidelines for the form and character of commercial, industrial or multi-family residential development.

Justification

Much of the development of the Interlakes Plan area is focused on residential and recreational property uses. Furthermore, Highway No. 24 is a gateway to the Interlakes area, and can be one of the initial vistas that a visitor observes upon entering the Interlakes area. In order to enhance the tourism attributes to reflect the predominant residential/recreational uses, yet recognize opportunities for commercial/industrial developments, a development permit can give consideration to the visual effect and form of development.

Guidelines

Where the Regional Board has received an application for rezoning a property to industrial or commercial use, the Regional Board will require the proponent to simultaneously apply for a development permit. Development permits are required prior to construction of new buildings, as well as for the addition to, or alterations to the exterior of existing buildings. Any issuance of a development permit will be based on the following guidelines:

Form and Character

  1. buildings and structures should be constructed with shaped roof, with pitches, as opposed to long, continuous roofs with flat roof lines;
  2. the distinctive form and character of new buildings, exterior renovations and signage should relate to a rural character, with recreation as a theme; and,
  3. usage of natural or earth-toned coloured building exteriors is encouraged.

Form and Character

Landscaping and Screening

  1. Parking spaces should be in small clusters with visual breaks, separated from the main highway by landscaping, and screened from adjoining non-commercial, non-industrial, and non-multi-family properties by landscaping;
  2. All outdoor loading areas, storage areas and garbage receptacles shall be, wherever possible, located at the rear of buildings out of view of the public road and shall be screened from adjacent property with solid fencing or landscaping; and,
  3. Signage should be low to be visually unobtrusive, be visually appealing, and be located to minimize the need for illumination.

Exemptions

A Development Permit will not be required under the following conditions:

  1. subdivision;
  2. single and two-family dwelling construction, temporary dwellings and accessory buildings and structures;
  3. farm buildings;
  4. alteration of exterior colour; and,
  5. interior renovations and alterations.

Development Permit Area No. 2 – Aquatic Habitat Ecosystem Protection

All lakes, rivers, creeks and streams within the Plan area are deemed to be subject to Development Permit Area No. 2 – Aquatic Habitat Ecosystem Protection.

The buffer area where Development Permits are required is based on the Water Quality Sensitivity Ratings, as defined by the Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management. The higher the water sensitivity rating, the greater the area of influence of the Development Permit area.

Water Quality Sensitivity RatingInfluence of Development Permit Area *
High250 m
Moderate200 m
Low150 m

Note: * the distances specified apply to all lands within the specified distance from the natural boundary of a lake or pond.

Where lakes and waterbodies have not yet received a water sensitivity rating, they will default to high sensitivity. A landowner may commission a study, at his expense, for water sensitivity and the results will be used to update the map, without the need for a public hearing.

In the case of rivers, creeks or streams, the Development Permit area are lands within 100 m of the natural boundary.

Schedule ‘E’ identifies Development Permit areas, in accordance with Section 919.1(l)(a) of the Local Government Act. This development permit area follows guidelines established in the Cariboo Regional District’s “Shoreland Management Policy”. It is recommended that this document be consulted, particularly, Section 1 “Onsite Effluent Disposal Guidelines”, and Section 2 “Riparian Buffer Zone Guidelines”.

Category

For protection of the natural environment, its ecosystems and biological diversity.

Justification

Part of the Plan area is important for fish rearing and spawning habitat. It is the intent of the Development Permit Area to protect foreshore development from activities that cause erosion or otherwise disturb fish habitat. In addition, disturbance to native vegetation can affect living environments for wildlife. Leave or buffer strips are areas of land adjacent to a waterbody that are left in a largely undisturbed state and assist in protecting property from flooding and potential loss of and purify land-based contaminants from entering a waterbody. It is in the public interest to regulate land development initiatives proximate to a waterbody. In addition, with mosquitoes being known to spread the West Nile Virus, healthy shorelines enable the survival of natural predator species, such as dragonflies.

Guidelines

Where the Regional Board has received an, application for a building permit when located within a building permit specified area, or where a landowner or tenant desires to construct a building or structure or alteration of land (including the removal of natural vegetation, grading, removal, deposit or moving of fill), or apply for land subdivision within Development Permit Area No. 2, the Regional Board will require the proponent to simultaneously apply, at his expense, for a development permit. Development permits are required prior to construction of, or addition to, a building or structure, land subdivision application, or when commencing site work affecting shoreline vegetation. Any issuance of a development permit will be based on the following guidelines:

  1. Sewage disposal systems design and location shall minimize or eliminate the possibility for organic loading or harmful nutrients or organisms entering a waterbody. It will be required to retain the services of a qualified engineer, BC Land Surveyor, registered professional forester, or agrologist to undertake soil analyses, and to design and propose location of a septic system based on the soil analysis and density of land development;
  2. Where shoreline vegetation has been removed from the property, a development permit will require a re-planting scheme;
  3. Vegetated ‘leave strips’ or buffer areas of a minimum of 15 m are required. The buffer or leave strips are to remain in a largely undisturbed state. Figure 1 illustrates ‘leave strips’ or buffer areas. In the case of Sensitive Fish habitat areas, as identified on Schedule ‘D’, the buffer or leave strip shall be 30 m.
  4. Road rights-of-way and driveways shall be located or constructed of material that will not contribute to surface run-off into a waterbody (gravel is an example of a porous surface); and,
  5. Development of land for agricultural purposes may be permitted within the buffer area should policies or regulations established by federal or provincial agencies allow such use or development, or that accepted practices of agricultural stewardship groups that meet or exceed any government policy or regulation, is adhered to.

The Regional Board shall require that an application for a development permit be subject to receiving a report from a qualified biologist that would identify mitigative measures to reduce impact on the environment. Alternatively, a written report from Fisheries and Oceans Canada, or the Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection that addresses environmental impact would be acceptable for consideration of permit issuance.

Exceptions

The following activities are permitted within a Development Permit Area without first requiring a Development Permit:

  1. Where a rezoning application is required prior to any land development, that requires compliance with the Cariboo Regional District’s “Shoreland Management Policy”, compliance with Guideline a) will not be required;
  2. Where a rezoning application is not required and the septic system will be installed at a minimum distance of 250 m from the natural boundary of a lake, wetland or pond, or at a minimum distance of 100 m from the natural boundary of a river, creek, or stream;
  3. Where development complies with Guideline a), and any development or land disturbance will be beyond 15 m from the natural boundary of a lake, wetland or pond, or beyond 15 m from the natural boundary of land adjacent to a river, creek or stream. Further, said development is not located adjacent to a sensitive fish habitat that requires approval from the Federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans, or the BC Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection;
  4. Farm fences;
  5. Removal of noxious weeds or invasive plants, as defined by provincial government legislation;
  6. Construction of an access point to a waterbody is permitted subject to: the access point is not established in an area subject to bank erosion (unless mitigative measures are undertaken)
    1. an access trail shall have a permeable surface, such as gravel, or soil, that allows the passage of water
    2. development of the access shall be limited to 25 percent of the lot’s waterfrontage;
  7. An existing dwelling and related structures may continue to be located within the buffer or leave area, however any future additions that would be located outside the 25 percent stipulated in e) ii) above would require an Aquatic Habitat Ecosystem Protection Development Permit; and,
  8. A subdivision, provided that the smallest lot created in not less than 20 ha, or the creation of a lot with both a minimum site area of 4 hectares, and a minimum waterfrontage of 300 m.
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APPENDIX 1     

LAND RECOMMENDED FOR BLOCK EXCLUSION FROM THE AGRICULTURAL LAND RESERVE

Sheridan Lake East

Lots 8, 9, 10 & 11, District Lot 4281, Lillooet District, Plan 18363
Lots 3, 4, 5 & 6, District Lot 4281, Lillooet District, Plan 19500
Lot 4, District Lot 4281, Lillooet District, Plan KAP44677
Lots A & B, District Lot 4281, Lillooet District, Plan KAP67734
Part S ½, District Lot 4281, Lillooet District, except Plans 18363, 35709 & 36388

Sheridan Lake West

District Lots 4465 & 4466, Lillooet District

Roe Lake

Lots 1 – 5, District Lot 4302, Lillooet District, Plan 37144